Archivio della categoria Volvo Ocean Race 2014/2015

Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit brings ‘Clean Seas’ campaign pledge from Spain, new scientific programme

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“Our oceans are under attack” – Wendy Schmidt

The Volvo Ocean Race has used the first of seven Ocean Summits it is hosting around the world in 2017-18 to launch a unique programme that will gather data from parts of the oceans that are otherwise inaccessible to scientists – while the Spanish government pledged its backing for UN Environment’s Clean Seas campaign.

© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

Wednesday’s Ocean Summit in Alicante – held four days before the start of the 2017-18 edition of sailing’s 45-year-old race around the world – brought together politicians, scientists, business and sport to tackle the problem of ocean health, with a specific focus on plastic pollution.

As the world’s 14th largest economy, Spain’s declaration of support is a significant boost to the UN’s global campaign, which now boasts 32 member states and aims to ‘turn the tide on plastic’ by inspiring action from governments, businesses and individuals.

‘Over the past six years we have been developing Spain’s new Marine Strategy, and one of its main goals is to tackle marine litter,’ said Raquel Orts Nebot, Spain’s Director General for Coast and Sea Sustainability. ‘In this regard, I confirm that Spain is joining the UN Clean Seas Campaign, with the firm purpose of supporting this global initiative and contributing to its impact worldwide.’

Head of UN Environment, Erik Solheim said: “Spain’s engagement in this campaign sends an important message across the Mediterranean region and the world. Our oceans are fundamental to our survival that we must do everything we can to protect them.”

Mayor of Alicante Gabriel Echávarri promised that there would be no plastic bottles at any event he attends in an official capacity. He also announced an education campaign on plastic in all schools in the city.

Wendy Schmidt, President of The Schmidt Family Foundation and Co-founder of 11th Hour Racing, told the Ocean Summit that the oceans were ‘under attack’.

© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

“11th Hour Racing has been working since 2011 to engage sailors and the maritime industries to become advocates for a healthy ocean and we’ve seen a lot of conferences where people tell each other what they already know,” said Schmidt.

“What was special about this Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit is that this was a conference full of very creative thinkers. We’re all looking for answers. There are large companies here, small start-ups, NGOs and philanthropists, and everybody is trying to explore how to intervene with an innovative approach.

“We have to create a new plastic economy, develop new strategies, new technologies and new industries. Our goal is to make sure that this conversation happens everywhere. It doesn’t matter who you are or what you do, the oceans are our life support system.”

This sentiment was echoed by Kerstin Stranimaier, Director, Planet Possible for AkzoNobel: “We all need to open our eyes to new opportunities.”

The Science Programme is key to that goal of creating action to tackle plastic pollution, based on accurate data.

The Programme – made possible thanks to the support of Volvo Cars, and a consortium including NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), JCOMMOPS (UNESCO-IOC), GEOMAR and SubCtech – is comprised of three elements.

© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

All of the racing yachts in the 2017-18 edition will send data back from the oceans every 10 seconds – recording temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction. This data will be passed on to NOAA and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. It will contribute to more accurate weather forecasts and climate models.

Secondly, during the four most isolated legs in the race, all seven yachts will carry drifter buoys equipped with satellite communications to transmit information on ocean composition and currents.

Thirdly, the Turn the Tide on Plastic team skippered by British yachtswoman Dee Caffari will carry instruments onboard to test salinity, dissolved CO2 and Chlorophyll-a (algae), and for the first time ever, microplastics, directly in the sea water around them.

These key metrics for ocean health will be logged in order to create a complete snapshot of parts of the world’s oceans scientists rarely, if ever, get to study.

“Volvo Cars is proud to support the Volvo Ocean Race Science Programme and help improve our understanding of the health of the oceans,” said Niklas Kilberg, Volvo Cars’ Senior Manager for Sustainability. “This innovative project means that the boats are not just sailing in a top-level sporting competition, but they’re also undertaking scientific research.

“By collecting data from the remotest parts of the oceans they’ll be collecting vital information which can be used to help improve marine health, including tackling the growing problem of plastic pollution.”

Paulo Mirpuri, Founder of the Mirpuri Foundation commented: “The Volvo Ocean Race, besides being a sport competition, also attracts a lot of people and attention on to the sustainability problem. The Mirpuri Foundation is very proud to be a principal partner of the sustainability programme of the Volvo Ocean Race.”

“We believe that the Race is a global platform that allows us to communicate simultaneously our message and the message of the Ocean Summits to millions of people around the world. The Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summits are a very powerful tool for the Mirpuri Foundation and for all of the sustainability partners here today.”

The next Ocean Summit is scheduled for 7 December at Cape Town.

“Partnering with the Volvo Ocean Race is a great opportunity, to accelerate ocean understanding through sport, science and innovation,” Schmidt concluded. “In this race, which crosses 45,000 nautical miles and touches 12 iconic Host Cities, the sailors can bring stories of the ocean everywhere, giving us a strong platform to engage new audiences all over the world.”


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‘Our oceans are under attack – and we’re fighting back’

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The Volvo Ocean Race has used the first of seven Ocean Summits it is hosting around the world in 2017-18 to launch a unique programme that will gather data from parts of the oceans that are otherwise inaccessible to scientists – while the Spanish government pledged its backing for UN Environment’s Clean Seas campaign.

Wednesday’s Ocean Summit in Alicante – held four days before the start of the 2017-18 edition of sailing’s 45-year-old race around the world – brought together politicians, scientists, business and sport to tackle the problem of ocean health, with a specific focus on plastic pollution.

As the world’s 14th largest economy, Spain’s declaration of support is a significant boost to the UN’s global campaign, which now boasts 32 member states and aims to ‘turn the tide on plastic’ by inspiring action from governments, businesses and individuals.

‘Over the past six years we have been developing Spain’s new Marine Strategy, and one of its main goals is to tackle marine litter,’ said Raquel Orts Nebot, Spain’s Director General for Coast and Sea Sustainability. ‘In this regard, I confirm that Spain is joining the UN Clean Seas Campaign, with the firm purpose of supporting this global initiative and contributing to its impact worldwide.’

Head of UN Environment, Erik Solheim said: “Spain’s engagement in this campaign sends an important message across the Mediterranean region and the world. Our oceans are fundamental to our survival that we must do everything we can to protect them.”

Mayor of Alicante Gabriel Echávarri promised that there would be no plastic bottles at any event he attends in an official capacity. He also announced an education campaign on plastic in all schools in the city.

Wendy Schmidt, President of The Schmidt Family Foundation and Co-founder of 11th Hour Racing, told the Ocean Summit that the oceans were ‘under attack’.

© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

“11th Hour Racing has been working since 2011 to engage sailors and the maritime industries to become advocates for a healthy ocean and we’ve seen a lot of conferences where people tell each other what they already know,” said Schmidt.

“What was special about this Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit is that this was a conference full of very creative thinkers. We’re all looking for answers. There are large companies here, small start-ups, NGOs and philanthropists, and everybody is trying to explore how to intervene with an innovative approach.

“We have to create a new plastic economy, develop new strategies, new technologies and new industries. Our goal is to make sure that this conversation happens everywhere. It doesn’t matter who you are or what you do, the oceans are our life support system.”

This sentiment was echoed by Kerstin Stranimaier, Director, Planet Possible for AkzoNobel: “We all need to open our eyes to new opportunities.”

The Science Programme is key to that goal of creating action to tackle plastic pollution, based on accurate data.

The Programme – made possible thanks to the support of Volvo Cars, and a consortium including NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), JCOMMOPS (UNESCO-IOC), GEOMAR and SubCtech – is comprised of three elements.

© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

All of the racing yachts in the 2017-18 edition will send data back from the oceans every 10 seconds – recording temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction. This data will be passed on to NOAA and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. It will contribute to more accurate weather forecasts and climate models.

Secondly, during the four most isolated legs in the race, all seven yachts will carry drifter buoys equipped with satellite communications to transmit information on ocean composition and currents.

Thirdly, the Turn the Tide on Plastic team skippered by British yachtswoman Dee Caffari will carry instruments onboard to test salinity, dissolved CO2 and Chlorophyll-a (algae), and for the first time ever, microplastics, directly in the sea water around them.

These key metrics for ocean health will be logged in order to create a complete snapshot of parts of the world’s oceans scientists rarely, if ever, get to study.

“Volvo Cars is proud to support the Volvo Ocean Race Science Programme and help improve our understanding of the health of the oceans,” said Niklas Kilberg, Volvo Cars’ Senior Manager for Sustainability. “This innovative project means that the boats are not just sailing in a top-level sporting competition, but they’re also undertaking scientific research.

“By collecting data from the remotest parts of the oceans they’ll be collecting vital information which can be used to help improve marine health, including tackling the growing problem of plastic pollution.”

Paulo Mirpuri, Founder of the Mirpuri Foundation commented: “The Volvo Ocean Race, besides being a sport competition, also attracts a lot of people and attention on to the sustainability problem. The Mirpuri Foundation is very proud to be a principal partner of the sustainability programme of the Volvo Ocean Race.”

“We believe that the Race is a global platform that allows us to communicate simultaneously our message and the message of the Ocean Summits to millions of people around the world. The Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summits are a very powerful tool for the Mirpuri Foundation and for all of the sustainability partners here today.”

The next Ocean Summit is scheduled for 7 December at Cape Town.

“Partnering with the Volvo Ocean Race is a great opportunity, to accelerate ocean understanding through sport, science and innovation,” Schmidt concluded. “In this race, which crosses 45,000 nautical miles and touches 12 iconic Host Cities, the sailors can bring stories of the ocean everywhere, giving us a strong platform to engage new audiences all over the world.”


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Fluidmesh Networks selected as Official Supplier for the Volvo Ocean Race

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Fluidmesh Networks was founded in 2005 by a team of researchers and visionaries from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Politecnico of Milan.

Fluidmesh technology will be used to reliably deliver fiber-like performance via unlicensed wireless spectrum – providing connectivity for mission-critical video, voice, and data, a critical need for the Volvo Ocean Race.

Fluidmesh mesh radios will be used to create a backbone mesh network between vessels and the shore and across the Race Villages during the In-Port races covering an area up to 10 square nautical miles.

“Our Race Village environments are often challenging for networks,” said Jordi Neves, the Chief Digital Officer of the Volvo Ocean Race.

“Fluidmesh state-of-the-start wireless mesh networks provide the flexibility, performance, and resilience we need to deliver a unique experience to the public and guests visiting any of our Race villages in 12 cities.”

“We are extremely excited to be able to partner with the Volvo Ocean Race and assist them with their networking and communication needs during the in-port races,” said Cosimo Malesci, Co-Founder and EVP Sales and Marketing at Fluidmesh Networks.

“We found in this race a great opportunity to demonstrate the capabilities of our fast-roaming mesh networking technology. The demanding environmental conditions and the dynamic nature of the event are a sweet spot for our wireless solutions. As a company, we focus on delivering wireless connectivity in extremely challenging scenarios. We feel we couldn’t have found a better partner and event to prove our point.”

Fluidmesh Networks is an MIT spin-off that develops innovative wireless technology that is a critical enabler of the “Internet of Things.” We manufacture radios, and focus on delivering connectivity solutions in some of the most challenging environments in the world. Fluidmesh Networks is a critical element in the adoption of automation in industries such as security, entertainment, mining, rail, ports and terminal operations, material handling, robotics, and the military. Fluidmesh’ technology is used by government agencies, Fortune 500 companies and global conglomerates to maintain cutting edge operations and a competitive advantage.


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‘The ocean is not a bottomless pit for our waste’

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© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

The Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit in Alicante is the first of seven events in Host Cities around the planet – a fascinating meeting of minds from the worlds of science, sport, government and business.

It’s about tangible action to address the problem, sharing ideas and networking to create powerful cross-industry relationship and links. Paul Rose, a highly experienced explorer, TV broadcaster and ocean advocate, is MC for the Alicante event – and we chatted to him about kicking off the exciting set of conferences on Wednesday.

Why are you coming to MC the first of the Volvo Ocean Race’s Ocean Summits?
Conferences like the Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit are great because that means that commitments are being made in front of a global audience, a chance to celebrate and champion what’s being done, whilst creating a level of competition for other leaders and activists. All these people then realise that this is the standard to aspire to regarding ocean protection. It’s all to do with leadership. We have enough science and enough facts about the ocean, but now we need to share that message and inspire people to make changes. The key thing is that these conferences are not just talking shops, they’ve become action-focused events, and that’s why I like them. That’s what I’m expecting here.

Why is it important for sporting events like the Volvo Ocean Race to amplify the plastic pollution message?
Sports events get a big audience. I travel around the world to these ocean conferences and we’re all like a happy group of sea gypsies, but there’s always the danger of just speaking to each other about it. Getting our message out through sports and platforms like the Volvo Ocean Race allows us to speak to a fresh audience. Sport speaks to all of us… children, global leaders, teachers, business guys. Everybody out there is interested in one sport or another.

The Volvo Ocean Race is a world-class global sporting event and it reaches so many people through the amazing sporting endeavours of the characters within it. If you can carry a message about the ocean while people are fully engaged in an ocean race, then that’s a great start.

© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

How can Volvo Ocean Race sailors carry the clean seas message and share their experiences with the world?
When people see the exciting human adventure that is racing around the world, they become interested, even if they’re not into sailing, or boats. Competition is a basic human desire. If we can use that energy of human desire for the race, and the commitment of the people doing it to pass on the messages of ocean conservation, then we’re onto a winner. When people look at offshore sailors, they see an ocean lover. It is possible to capture a whole new audience that people like Greenpeace or Governments can’t reach. The audience is engaged and that’s so important. So you’ve got government, global leaders and influencers, sports people, NGO’s, media, scientists, all working on their bit of the problem, and now is the time to work together.

You have dived in places all around the world. What have you seen that shocks you about this problem?

© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

I’ve been diving since 1969 and I’ve been seeing a lot less fish and a lot more plastic. Every single dive I’m on, whether it’s in the Russian Arctic, Antarctica or the middle of the Pacific, when we take our plastic samples, we always find it. I haven’t dived anywhere now where there’s no plastic.

It breaks down into smaller pieces and now it’s in the fish, the birds and there’s no doubt that it’s in us humans, too. We’ve got a plastic sea out there and no one knows what the long-term consequences are going to be.

What can people do in their daily lives to make a difference?
The biggest thing that we’ve discovered recently is that we can all make a difference because we’re all part of the problem. We used to imagine that the ocean was a bottomless pit for all of our waste. But we know now that it isn’t. People love plastic. We use it every day. Our relationship with it is starting to change. I now see people in London carrying their plastic sandwich packs to a recycling bin whereas just a couple of years ago they would have piled it on top of an overstuffed rubbish bin where it would have blown into the Thames and then the sea with the first gust of wind. I believe that I am seeing behavioural changes that we would never have seen even a couple of years ago.


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MUSTO becomes first global company to sign up to the United Nations Environment Clean Seas pledge

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© Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race

Musto, the world’s leading Sailing, Country and Adventure brand, is today announced as the first private business to sign up to support the United Nations Environment’s Clean Seas Pledge on the pressing global issue of marine litter.

Musto’s pledge of support was announced today at the Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit, taking place in Alicante, Spain. The summit is taking place ahead of the 13th Volvo Ocean Race, which sets sail from the Spanish city this Sunday (22nd October) and will take in 12 Global Host Cities before arriving at the finish line in The Hague in The Netherlands in June 2018.

The Clean Seas Pledge is overseen by the United Nations Environment Programme and is seeking support from global organisations in addressing the growing issue of marine litter. Recent estimates suggest that over 8 million tonnes of plastic waste are leaked into global oceans every year.

In 2015, the UN estimates that global consumer produced 322 million tonnes of plastic. Musto’s pledge of support is the business’ latest major innovation in its efforts to drive greater sustainability in its global business operations.

Earlier this summer, working with partners Vestas 11th Hour Racing, Musto sought to reduce the environmental impact of the plastic used to deliver its garments.

Peter Smith, CEO of Musto comments, ‘It fills me with immense pride to announce that Musto is the first private business to pledge its support to the United Nations Environment’s Clean Seas Pledge. Marine litter and ocean health is one of the most pressing issues of our generation, I am proud to lead such a forward thinking business in this area.

We are all here to celebrate the start of a great sporting event, but it is important to raise awareness of this issue and take steps to support the UN in addressing a real challenge of our time

Peter Smith

As part of this effort and in partnership with 11th Hour Racing and the Sustainability Team at the Volvo Ocean Race, Musto identified ‘pre-consumer waste’ as an area where real efficiencies could be made in terms of the material used in the storage and delivery of Musto products without impacting the customer experience.

After a series of stringent tests on both the production process of Musto carrier bags and garment packaging, efficiencies were made that amounted to a 70% reduction in the amount of plastic used in the manufacture, packaging and delivery of Musto’s 2017/18 Volvo Ocean Race Collection.

Musto has since committed to rolling out these packaging innovations to the manufacture of all product ranges in 2018. This will save 11 tons of plastic a year, the equivalent of over 61,000 plastic bottles from next year. Musto have also appointed an Acting Sustainability Officer, Annaleigh Hockaday, to oversee the process and drive for further developments in this area.

Download the Musto case study – ‘Reducing our Environmental Impact’

Reducing our Environmental Impact

Full press release here


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